What to see in Kyoto in 3 days [GUIDE + ITINERARY + VIDEO]

Summary of contents of this post

Welcome to Kyoto! This beautiful city perfectly blends Japan’s oldest traditions with the evolution of a 21st century city. Kyoto is together with Osaka and Tokyo, one of the most important cities in Japan. In this video-post we are going to talk about what to see in Kyoto in 3 days. We spent 4 nights in Kyoto, but one of the days we dedicated it completely to Nara, which we will talk about later.

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When you consider planning your visit to the city of Kyoto the feeling may be overwhelming at first, because Kyoto is quite big and has a lot (VERY MUCHISIMO) to see, so it can be difficult to plan the itinerary at first. So in this post what to see in Kyoto in 3 days, we are going to tell you what you can see in each area every day, where to eat, where to sleep, how to organize your visits to points of interest, prices, etc …

If you want more information about our trip to Japan you can find it here: complete guide to Japan, what to see in Tokyo in 5 days, Tokyo neighborhoods, map of Japan, how to find cheap flights to Japan, how to pack, tips for traveling to Japan from Spain, visa for Japan, plugs in Japan …

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If you don’t feel like reading much, we have also made this video-guide in which we talked about what to see in Kyoto in 3 days, but a little more entertaining šŸ˜‰

Can you see Kyoto in 3 days?

The answer to this question, in this case, for a change, is NO. I think even if we spent a whole week there, it would be impossible to see the whole week.

We were there 4 days, although one of them was dedicated to Nara. So our recommendation is that you dediques between 2 and 4 days, being the ideal thing to be able to see it calmly 4 days. If you do excursions outside the city, you can also take advantage of the evenings when you return to the city.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Kioto de noche desde Fushimi InariQuƩ ver en Kioto: Kioto de noche desde Fushimi InariWhat to see in Kyoto: Kyoto by night from Fushimi Inari

You have to assume that Kyoto is almost infinite (it has 17 World Heritage sites, more than 1,000 Buddhist temples and 400 Shinto shrines), so you’re likely to leave a lot of things unseen. But if you think about it, it’s a perfect excuse to go back to šŸ˜‰

The truth is that we didn’t give much (A LOT) of a pity having to give up all the things we couldn’t visit due to lack of time. That and that maybe some days we plan above our means. In any case, in the map below you will find all the points of interest in the city even if we could not visit them.

How to get around Kyoto

We are going to write an independent post talking about all the options you have to move around Kyoto, but our main recommendation is that you use the bus. There are plenty of high frequency lines that run through the entire city and will take you to the most important points of tourist interest. In addition they are super punctual and you will be able to help you of Google Maps to know which one you have to catch in every moment.

QuĆ© ver en Kioto: EstaciĆ³n de KiotoQuĆ© ver en Kioto: EstaciĆ³n de KiotoWhat to see in Kyoto: Kyoto Station

The bad news is that the JR Pass will not serve you for Kyoto buses and will only be useful for you to reach the Fushimi Inari Shrine or Nara by train. However, at Kyoto station you can buy an unlimited Day Pass for all buses for 600 JPY per person per day. If you think you’re not going to use buses a lot, a single ticket costs 230 JPY, but think that with 3 trips a day you can make up for it.

Bus Day Pass KiotoBus Day Pass KiotoBus Day Pass Kyoto

We bought these passes for all the days we spent in Kyoto and the truth is that we got a lot out of them. As I told you a little above, we bought them at Kyoto station as soon as we arrived and then you only have to validate every day when you get on a bus for the first time. The rest of the trips, you just have to show it to the conduit as you go down.

You have to keep in mind that in Japan in general, you get on the buses through the back door and get off through the front door, so you pay (or show the ticket) when you leave.

Mapa Bus KiotoMapa Bus KiotoKyoto Bus Map

You can consult the map of Kyoto buses in high resolution in this link.

What to see in Kyoto in 3 days

If you ask us what to see in Kyoto, no doubt these would be the places that we recommend and that you can not miss. To make it easier for you, we have compiled them all on this map separated by colors. Every color is a day.

What to see in Kyoto | Day 1: Western and Southern Kyoto – Arashiyama and Fushimi Inari

On the day of our arrival in Kyoto we decided that the best thing would be to visit the points of interest furthest away from our accommodation, so after admiring the station building and the Kyoto tower, we went to the hotel and once the check-in was done, we left the suitcases and went to tour the city. First taking a walk and then by bus to Arashiyama. We arrived in Kyoto at mid-morning so we didn’t really have a full day to visit the city the way we like it (early morning šŸ˜‰ ), but we were still able to make the most of the day.

Kyoto Station

As in Tokyo, Kyoto itself is a tourist attraction in its own right, as it is a kind of futuristic cathedral of steel and glass. In the eastern part of the building, on the seventh floor, you access the glass or Skyway eleventh floor, which is open from 10:00 to 22:00 and crosses over the roof of the main lobby of the station, via escalators. In addition, on the 15th floor you will also find the Sky Garden terrace/viewpoint.

QuĆ© ver en Kioto: EstaciĆ³n de KiotoQuĆ© ver en Kioto: EstaciĆ³n de KiotoWhat to see in Kyoto: Kyoto StationQuĆ© ver en Kioto: EstaciĆ³n de KiotoQuĆ© ver en Kioto: EstaciĆ³n de KiotoWhat to see in Kyoto: Kyoto Station

Kyoto Tower

On the way to our hotel while we were taking a walk, we could admire the Kyoto Tower, which has nothing to do with Tokyo, but makes the attempt. In addition, at night it is illuminated with colors and gives a touch more modernity to the city along with the station.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Torre de KiotoQuƩ ver en Kioto: Torre de KiotoWhat to see in Kyoto: Kyoto Tower

It is situated ‘above’ the Kyoto Tower Hotel and at the top there is a viewpoint from which you get a wonderful view of the city. Climbing to the top of the Kyoto tower costs 770 JPY and the viewpoint is open from 9:00 to 21:00.

Nishi Hongan-ji

Walking north are two of the most important temples in this area, the Nishi Hongan-ji and the Higashi Hongan-ji. We only visit the first one because we prefer to take a bus to Arashiyama and dedicate more time to that area, but both are free and are a good option to start visiting Kyoto because they are close to the station.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: templo Nishi Hongan-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: templo Nishi Hongan-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Nishi Hongan-ji templeQuƩ ver en Kioto: templo Nishi Hongan-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: templo Nishi Hongan-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Nishi Hongan-ji temple

The first thing that surprised us about this temple is how giant its main hall is. Simply impressive. It is true that it is not one of the most beautiful temples that we visit in Kyoto, but if as we stay in this area, do not miss it. In addition its doors are spectacular and the whole enclosure is World Cultural Patrimony by the UNESCO.

As I told you a little above, entering this temple is free and is open from 5:30 to 17:00 hours.

Once the visit to this religious group is over, we go by bus to the area of Arashiyama, but in the ‘surroundings’ of this temple (orange on the map) there are several temples that are super interesting: Sanjusangen-do, Chinju-Hachimangu or To-ji, Tofukuji or Daigo-ji. If you have the time, don’t miss them!

Arashiyama Bamboo Forest

To get to the Arashiyama area you have two options: by bus from Kyoto station on line 28 or by JR train on the San-in line to Saga-Arashiyama. The only difference is that by bus you will take a little longer because of the traffic but you will have to walk less because to get closer to the area you have to visit.

QuĆ© ver en Kioto: bosque de bambĆŗ de ArashiyamaQuĆ© ver en Kioto: bosque de bambĆŗ de ArashiyamaWhat to see in Kyoto: Arashiyama bamboo forest

We got there just before lunchtime and we were really impressed to see him SO full of people. The bamboo forest has no more than what you see in the photos, and if it were the only thing you can visit in this area we would tell you that it is not worth going there, but it is true that it has around quite interesting temples. If you want to take the typical Instagram photo, the best thing is that you get up very early to be there first thing in the morning.

You don’t have to pay a ticket to see it and you can go at the time you want since it is not a closed enclosure.

Tenryu-ji Temple

Right at the entrance to the bamboo forest is one of the most important temples in the area and the only one we could visit in western Kyoto: Tenryu-ji Temple.

We liked this religious enclosure for its gardens and its nature, in which a timid momiji could already be appreciated.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Tenryu-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Tenryu-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Tenryu-ji

The entrance to the gardens costs 500 JPY and you will have to pay 300 JPY more per person if you want to visit the interior of the temple. Tenryu-ji Temple is open from 8:30 to 17:30, although between mid-October and mid-March it is only open until 17:00.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Tenryu-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Tenryu-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Tenryu-ji

In general, the Arashiyama area has many things to see and do. But you also have to bear in mind that it is quite a tourist area and therefore full of people. In addition to Tenryu-ji Temple, Giou-ji, Jojakko-ji, Okochi-Sanso or Suzumushidera (they are marked in orange on the map) are very worthwhile (from what we have read). Togetsu-kyo Bridge and the surrounding park are also worth a visit. You will find all these dots marked on the map in orange.

This area is also a perfect place to eat, because there are so many restaurants. In fact, I’ll tell you that here we ate one of the best sushi in Japan at Sushi Bar Naritaya, but we’ll tell you about it in our post about where to eat in Kyoto.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: ArashiyamaQuƩ ver en Kioto: ArashiyamaWhat to see in Kyoto: Arashiyama

At the end of our visit to Arashiyama, which was much shorter than we would have liked, we went to Saga-Arashiyama station to go by train to Fushimi Inari with the Nara Line that is included in the JR Pass.

Fushimi Inari

And we finish this first day visiting one of the mega highlights of the city: the Fushimi Inari sanctuary. This marvelous enclosure rests on the sacred Mount Inari, and its history seems to us marvelous and worthy of mention. But it’s not just its history that makes this place worthwhile. Fushimi Inari is like entering another world, a world full of vermillion toriis that accompany the path to the top of Mount Inari.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariQuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariWhat to see in Kyoto: Fushimi Inari

Although it was consecrated to the gods of rice and sake, today Fushimi Inari is venerated above all for prosperity in business and each torii you will find on the way up Mount Inari is a representation of the offerings of countless companies to the shrine. In fact, on the back of them you can see the company that made the offering.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariQuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariWhat to see in Kyoto: Fushimi InariQuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariQuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariWhat to see in Kyoto: Fushimi Inari

In addition to infinite red toriis, in Fushimi Inari you will find plenty of stone statues of foxes, an animal considered a messenger of the god Inari. The key you usually carry in your mouth represents the key to rice barns.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariQuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariWhat to see in Kyoto: Fushimi InariQuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariQuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariWhat to see in Kyoto: Fushimi Inari

We arrived at Fushimi Inari in the middle of the afternoon because we really wanted to watch the sunset from there and the truth is that climbing to the top while it was dark was an exceptional experience (and tired, because everything is uphill). Little by little, as you go uphill you will notice how the toriis (more than 1,000) are reducing their size and the road becomes narrower and narrower.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariQuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariWhat to see in Kyoto: Fushimi InariQuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariQuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariWhat to see in Kyoto: Fushimi Inari

When we arrived at the sanctuary, it was full of people, but little by little it was emptying and when we began to go down, already with closed night, we could enjoy the place practically in complete solitude. Really, this is one of Kyoto’s must-see visits.

Entrance to Fushimi Inari is completely free and is open from dawn to dusk.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariQuƩ ver en Kioto: Fushimi InariWhat to see in Kyoto: Fushimi Inari

What to see in Kyoto on the first day if you have plenty of time

We have already told you above, Kyoto is infinite, so very much to our regret, for lack of time, we had to give up many of the points of interest that we would have liked to visit. Although they are already marked on the map (in orange), and we have been naming them by zones, if you have time, we will list them here:

Temple Sanjusangen-do.Temple Chinju-Hachimangu.Temple Tofukuji.Temple Daigo-ji.Temple Suzumushidera.Okochi Sanso.Temple Giou-ji.Temple Jojakko-ji.

What to See in Kyoto | Day 2: East Kyoto – The Route of the Temples

We start our second day in Kyoto! And as you can imagine, we had one of our own early risers to start the day in one of the most beautiful areas of Kyoto: the path of the Philosopher. Like the day before, we had to leave a lot of places on the way without being able to visit them for lack of time. You will find all the places we visited and those we wanted to visit and we couldn’t on our map in purple.

Philosopher’s Walk – Philosopher’s Walk

The Philosopher’s Way is a beautiful walk surrounded by nature that runs along a small canal from Ginkaku-ji Temple, the northernmost temple in this area, and Eikan-do Temple.

QuĆ© ver en Kioto: Camino del FilĆ³sofoQuĆ© ver en Kioto: Camino del FilĆ³sofoWhat to see in Kyoto: The Philosopher’s Way

It is in this place where you will be fully aware of the special beauty of this city. For us this tour is one of the best things to see in Kyoto. It will take you about half an hour to cover the whole of it, not to mention how long it takes you to visit the temples that you will find along the way and which we will talk about now.

QuĆ© ver en Kioto: Camino del FilĆ³sofoQuĆ© ver en Kioto: Camino del FilĆ³sofoWhat to see in Kyoto: The Philosopher’s Way

The path owes its name to the philosopher Nishida Kitaro, one of his most famous passers-by who, it seems, got lost as he walked along it attracted by his thoughts.

Ginkaku-ji or silver pavilion

The first temple we visited in our second day in Kyoto was the Ginkaku-ji, one of the most important temples in this area of the city. As in most of the temples we visited in Kyoto, what we liked the most about the silver pavilion was its exquisite relationship with nature, which is a perfect part as an element of the enclosure.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Ginkaku-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Ginkaku-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Ginkaku-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Ginkaku-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Ginkaku-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Ginkaku-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Ginkaku-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Ginkaku-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Ginkaku-ji

This temple is one of the most visited places in Kyoto, so our recommendation is that you go early to avoid marabuntas. We were able to visit it quite calmly, but when we left it started to fill up quite a bit.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Ginkaku-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Ginkaku-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Ginkaku-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Ginkaku-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Ginkaku-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Ginkaku-ji

From the top of the temple, which is reached through an interesting stairway, you get very cool views of the city.

Admission to Ginkaku-ji costs 500 JPY per person and the schedule is as follows:

From March to November from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. From December to February from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Honen-in

Just over 10 minutes’ walk south of the silver pavilion is another of the temples we will visit during our walk along the philosopher’s path: Honen-in. A much more humble temple and for our taste, much more charming and much more authentic.

QuĆ© ver en Kioto: HoĢ„nen-inQuĆ© ver en Kioto: HoĢ„nen-inWhat to see in Kyoto: HoĢ„nen-inQuĆ© ver en Kioto: HoĢ„nen-inQuĆ© ver en Kioto: HoĢ„nen-inWhat to see in Kyoto: HoĢ„nen-in

And how wonderful to be able to visit him in the solitude of the early morning! This temple is small, secluded and super special.

Entrance to Honen-in is free and open every day from 6:00 to 16:00.

Third temple of the day: the Eikan-do. And after two temples much more ‘collected’, the Eikan-do impresses by its immensity, not only in what has to do with nature, also in relation to the various buildings that make up the religious enclosure.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Eikan-doQuƩ ver en Kioto: Eikan-doWhat to see in Kyoto: Eikan-do

The Eikan-do is well worth a visit for its pagoda and pavilions with wooden corridors that help you enter another era of Japanese history. Simply beautiful, really.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Eikan-doQuƩ ver en Kioto: Eikan-doWhat to see in Kyoto: Eikan-doQuƩ ver en Kioto: Eikan-doQuƩ ver en Kioto: Eikan-doWhat to see in Kyoto: Eikan-doQuƩ ver en Kioto: Eikan-doQuƩ ver en Kioto: Eikan-doWhat to see in Kyoto: Eikan-do

Two mini-tips when visiting this temple:

To visit the temple buildings you’ll have to take your shoes off, and they’re pretty big, so if you don’t go in summer you might get cold feet. It is not superfluous to wear a pair of socks šŸ˜‰Si you are tired you can save yourself from climbing to the top of the pagoda because you get the same views as from the top of Ginkaku-ji.QuĆ© ver en Kioto: Eikan-doQuĆ© ver en Kioto: Eikan-doWhat to see in Kyoto: Eikan-do

Admission to the Eikan-do costs 600 JPY per person and is open daily from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.

Continuing our way south, we arrive at the next temple to visit: Nanzen-ji Temple. The entrance door to this temple is imposing and can go up for 500 JPY (we didn’t do it). The rest of the temple is free. You can also visit some gardens for 300 JPY per person.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Nanzen-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Nanzen-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Nanzen-ji

What struck us most about this temple is that there is a super curious red brick aqueduct.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Nanzen-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Nanzen-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Nanzen-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Nanzen-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Nanzen-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Nanzen-ji

As I said before, the visit to the temple grounds is free and the schedule is as follows:

From March to November from 8:40 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. From December to February from 8:40 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

After visiting this temple, we realized that we had been made lunchtime and that we were already quite hungry. Between that and the fact that we didn’t want the Kiyomizu Dera temple (the most important in Kyoto) to be closed to us and to be able to see it in time, we had to give up three of the most important sites we had planned for this day: the Chion-in temple, the Maruyama Park and the Yasaka Sanctuary.

Neighbourhood of Gion

From the Nanzen-ji we went to the place where we would eat that day, Gion Tanto, a restaurant specializing in okonomiyaki of which I will tell you in the post about where to eat in Kyoto. From there to the next temple (the Kiyomizu Dera) we took the opportunity to visit the neighborhood of Gion, which is the neighborhood of geishas and is really beautiful.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: GionQuƩ ver en Kioto: GionWhat to see in Kyoto: Gion

The Gion area is not only a perfect place to stroll at night and try to meet a maiko during the walk, it is also a perfect place to have lunch or dinner and soak up a great atmosphere.

Near Gion, if you have time, don’t miss Nishiki Market, a covered market full of stalls where you can find the most special ingredients of Japanese cuisine.

Ninenzaka and Sannenzaka Streets

From Gion to Kiyomizu Dera you’ll find two super cool traditional shopping streets that lead you to the most famous temple in Kyoto that you can’t miss for the world: Ninenzaka and Sannenzaka. On this way you will find the beautiful views of the Yasaka pagoda that you have seen so much in Instagram.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Calle SannenzakaQuƩ ver en Kioto: Calle SannenzakaWhat to see in Kyoto: Sannenzaka StreetQuƩ ver en Kioto: Calle SannenzakaQuƩ ver en Kioto: Calle SannenzakaWhat to see in Kyoto: Sannenzaka StreetQuƩ ver en Kioto: Calle SannenzakaQuƩ ver en Kioto: Calle SannenzakaWhat to see in Kyoto: Sannenzaka Street

Without a doubt, for us this is one of the most charming areas of Kyoto.

Kiyomizu Dera Temple

And we get to the highlight of the day! Because although it is true that we saw beautiful places all day long, Kiyomizu Dera impressed us, perhaps because we lived there some of the most beautiful sunsets of the whole trip. Simply magical.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Kiyomizu DeraQuƩ ver en Kioto: Kiyomizu DeraWhat to see in Kyoto: Kiyomizu Dera

The views from above are impressive although we find the main pavilion under construction. We found it curious that the scaffolding was made of wood, we imagined that not to break the magic that is always breathed in all Japanese temples.

Although it was one of the temples in which we found more people, it was a wonderful experience to visit it at sunset and it seems to us the ideal moment to make the visit, approaching to have dinner after giving a walk to the area of Pontocho.

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Entrance to the Kiyomizu Dera temple costs 400 JPY per person and is open from 6:00 to 18:00 (although it varies according to the seasons).

What to see in Kyoto on the second day if you have plenty of time

We have already told you above, Kyoto is infinite, so very much to our regret, for lack of time, we had to give up many of the points of interest that we would have liked to visit. Although they are already marked on the map (in purple), and we have been naming them by zones, if you have time, we will list them here:

Gokurakuji Temple.Kounji Temple.Kumano Nyakuoji Sanctuary.Heian Sanctuary.Chion-in Temple.Maruyama Park.Yasaka Sanctuary.Kennin-ji Temple.Kodai-ji Temple.

What to see in Kyoto | Day 3: North Kyoto – Imperial Villa and Golden Pavilion

Our third and last day in Kyoto was undoubtedly the weakest of all, and if we had known it before we would have managed it differently, as we left without seeing something very cool because we lost too much time in places that didn’t deserve it so much. We’re telling you right now what we failed at. By the way, on our map this day is in black.

Shugakuin Imperial Villa

The Imperial Villa is an enormous enclosure full of gardens, ponds, buildings and even farming areas that was formerly used by the family of Emperor Gomizunoo in the mid-seventeenth century. The site is very nice, that is so, but after the sites we had seen the day before we were not too surprised.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaQuƩ ver en Kioto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaWhat to see in Kyoto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaQuƩ ver en Kioto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaQuƩ ver en Kioto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaWhat to see in Kyoto: Shugakuin Imperial Villa

The way in which the tour is organized did not like us too much because you are rushed at all times without being able to rest, or admire the landscape quietly, or stop to take pictures throughout the time the tour lasted.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaQuƩ ver en Kioto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaWhat to see in Kyoto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaQuƩ ver en Kioto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaQuƩ ver en Kioto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaWhat to see in Kyoto: Shugakuin Imperial Villa

In addition to this, it must be borne in mind that the villa is on the outskirts of the city and that the nearest bus leaves you 15 minutes walk from the site, so between some things and others in the end you will need half a day to visit it.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaQuƩ ver en Kioto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaWhat to see in Kyoto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaQuƩ ver en Kioto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaQuƩ ver en Kioto: Shugakuin Imperial VillaWhat to see in Kyoto: Shugakuin Imperial Villa

Visiting the Imperial Villa is free, but it is necessary to book in advance on its website. Once you have the reservation you will have to go there at the time booked to be able to make the guided route (with audio-guide in Spanish).

Daitoku-ji

After taking a couple of buses we go to Daitoku-ji, a huge Buddhist temple, or better said, Buddhist temple complex, located north of Kyoto.

It should be noted that each Daitoku-ji sub-temple has a different price, ranging from 350 JPY for the smallest to 1,200 JPY for the largest such as the Daisen-in, a temple that is also Japan’s National Treasury.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Koto-inQuƩ ver en Kioto: Koto-inWhat to see in Kyoto: Koto-in

The site is worth a visit, but the fact that you have to pay for each of these sub-templates is a little discouraging. Besides, when we went we were unlucky enough that some of them were closed.

Kinkaku-ji or Golden Pavilion

And we arrive at the strong point of the day, the very famous Kinkaku-ji or Golden Pavilion, one of the most recognized places in Kyoto and perhaps in all of Japan. Get ready to fight for a place to be able to make the typical photo of the Pavilion that you have seen to all instagramer that has been in Japan.

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But despite the number of people, going to Kinkaku-ji is completely worth it. The Golden Pavilion impresses (not so much the pavilion itself but the contrast of the pavilion with the landscape), and the gardens that surround it are among the best in Kyoto, although without reaching the level of the Ginkaku-ji.

QuƩ ver en Kioto: Kinkaku-jiQuƩ ver en Kioto: Kinkaku-jiWhat to see in Kyoto: Kinkaku-ji

Access to the Golden Pavilion costs 400 JPY and you can visit it in half an hour (plus the time you are taking pictures). The Kinkaku-ji is open from 9:00 to 17:00.

We finished our visits from that day to mid-afternoon in the Golden Pavilion and we needed time to do the laundry after more than 10 days in Japan and REST, because at the pace we were taking we ended our adventure in Kyoto burst.

We can’t help but think of all the things we missed, but we can’t stop telling ourselves that we have a million excuses to go back to.

What to see in Kyoto on the third day if you have plenty of time

Although they are already marked on the map (in black), and we have been naming them by zones, if you have time, we will list them here:

Imperial Palace of Kyoto.Nijo Castle.Ryoan-ji Temple.Ninna-ji Temple.Ninna-ji Temple.Myōshinji.Kitano Tenmangu Temple.

Interesting day trips from Kyoto

Nara is a magical place. Walking through its large park surrounded by deer is one of the experiences you can not miss. In addition there are several beautiful temples that can be visited. In one of them, the Todai-ji, you will find one of the largest Buddha statues in Japan. Seriously, in simply awesome. And it’s a perfect day trip from Kyoto.

GuĆ­a de JapĆ³n: NaraGuĆ­a de JapĆ³n: NaraExcursions from Kyoto: Nara

Special activities to do in Kyoto

If you want to soak up all the history and culture of this wonderful city, you can do so with a private guided tour of Kyoto for groups.

Where to Sleep in Kyoto

The most important recommendation we can make regarding accommodation in Kyoto is that you book well in advance because it is quite expensive, especially if it coincides with an event or festival. In this case, unlike Tokyo, it is not necessary for your accommodation to be close to JR station because by bus you will easily reach any part of the city and you will probably have a bus stop nearby.

The only way to find good accommodation offers in Kyoto, almost like anywhere else, is to look at it ahead of time.

We are going to write a very long post about accommodation in Kyoto, but for now, we tell you about our experience with the hotel we choose.

Our hotel for these 4 nights in Kyoto was the Hale Temari Kyoto Rokujo, a traditional hotel (with tatami) located about 20 minutes walk north of Kyoto station.

To be honest, and despite the fact that we were treated with luxury, we would not repeat in this hotel because sleeping on a tatami only convinces us if the mattress to be put on the floor is fat and soft, and in this case it was not. Besides, the bathroom we had inside the room was tiny. It’s true that outside there was another huge shared bathroom with a great shower and bathtub, but in the end, it was shared.

DĆ³nde dormir en Kioto: Hotel Hale TemariDĆ³nde dormir en Kioto: Hotel Hale TemariWhere to Sleep in Kyoto: Hotel Hale TemariDĆ³nde dormir en Kioto: Hotel Hale Temari DĆ³nde dormir en Kioto: Hotel Hale Temari Where to Sleep in Kyoto: Hotel Hale Temari

We pay for the 4 nights in this hotel without breakfast 251 euros and as I told you a little above, despite the treatment and cleaning we would not repeat, especially for so many days. If it was just for one night, we’d choose it again without any problem.

Here are some of the top-ranked accommodation options in Booking in Kyoto:

Where to Eat in Kyoto

We’re going to write a super independent post like the one we wrote about where to eat in Tokyo, with videos, maps, and all our recommendations, but I’m afraid for now you’re going to have to wait šŸ˜‰

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