What to see in Salamanca in one day [GUIDE + ITINERARY + MAP]

Summary of content of this post

Continuing with our promise to give an important space to the Spanish destinations in this blog, today we come to talk about one of the cities with more history of Spain: Salamanca. In this video-post we want to tell you what to see in Salamanca in one day, a city that is a World Heritage Site. But we are not going to talk to you only about what to see or what to do, we also want to tell you other important things like where to eat, where to sleep, or what are the best excursions that can be made from this city.

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Salamanca is one of those cities that catches you from the first minute. With more than 160,000 inhabitants and a lot of students thanks to its university (one of the most important in the country), Salamanca is the European Capital of Culture, and the most important Spanish Renaissance city. In its historical and monumental centre, the different monuments and buildings from the different periods through which the city has passed coexist and are perfectly preserved. There’s little else you can do to make up your mind to visit her. Will you come with us?

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A little history of Salamanca

With almost 3,000 years of history, the origins of Salamanca date back to the Iron Age, when its first inhabitants began to establish settlements on the banks of the Tormes River, specifically on the Cerro de San Vicente.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Plaza Mayor de SalamancaQué ver en Salamanca: Plaza Mayor de SalamancaWhat to see in Salamanca: Plaza Mayor de Salamanca

Salamanca has seen Romans, Visigoths and Muslims pass through its streets, and all of them left their own mark on the city. The history of Salamanca could not be understood without its University, the oldest in Spain, founded in 1218 by Alfonso IX of Leon.

The University of Salamanca was for centuries one of the most prestigious universities in the West and saw such illustrious figures of history pass through its classrooms as Antonio de Nebrija, Christopher Columbus, Fernando de Rojas, Francisco de Vitoria, Fray Luis de Leon and Miguel de Unamuno, who now form part, not only of the history of the University, but of the city of Salamanca itself. Unamuno, a novelist and poet of the generation of ’98, wrote much of his work in Salamanca. And the city left its mark on his work, and his work left its mark on the city.

Declarada Patrimonio de la Humanidad por la UNESCO en el año 1988, Salamanca cuenta con uno de los conjuntos histórico-monumentales más importantes de la Península.

Can you see Salamanca in one day?

Salamanca is the capital of the province with the same name and belongs to the autonomous community of Castilla y León. Located in the southwest of the community, it is about 200 kilometers from Madrid and about 120 kilometers southwest of Valladolid. The province of Salamanca is fortunate to have a border with Portugal, Extremadura, Zamora, Valladolid and Avila.

The historic centre of Salamanca is quite compact, so if you spend a full day in the city you can walk around it without any problems. However, in a single day you will not be able to get an idea of all the good that Salamanca has to offer. It will serve to have a first contact with the most important points of interest and to stay with desire to visit it a second time. Our recommendation is that you dedicate at least one full weekend to Salamanca.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Patio de las Escuelas MenoresQué ver en Salamanca: Patio de las Escuelas MenoresWhat to see in Salamanca: Patio de las Escuelas Menores

The best thing you can do to discover Salamanca 100% is to get lost in its streets full of old stone churches, convents and historical buildings. Everywhere you look you’ll find history.

Besides, the good thing about Salamanca is that if you have some free time after getting to know the city, there are plenty of interesting plans that can be made in the surrounding area. You can spend a day or a week there, which I’m sure you won’t get bored.

How to get around Salamanca

As I mentioned a moment ago, the centre of Salamanca is quite compact, so if you stay nearby, you will have no problem walking to all the important points of interest in the city. We stayed at the Ibis Salamanca, which I’ll tell you about a little further down, and the truth is that we got everywhere on foot without any problem.

Remember that walking is how you discover the most special corners of cities 😉

Qué ver en Salamanca: Patio de EscuelasQué ver en Salamanca: Patio de EscuelasWhat to see in Salamanca: Patio de Escuelas

In any case, if you are going to leave the central area because you have more time and you want to know other areas of Salamanca, the city has a complete network of buses. In this link you can consult the map with the main lines.

Where to park in Salamanca

You will most likely arrive in Salamanca either by train or car. If you do it by train it is easy, because the station is only 20 minutes walk from the Plaza Mayor in Salamanca.

If you arrive by car it is also easy, although you have to take into account that in the central area of Salamanca there are many areas where you cannot park and others that are paid (most of them, actually). Below is a map with all the car parks you have available, which also has marked the areas where there is paid parking on the street.

The ORA or pay zone in Salamanca has the following conditions:

The maximum time you can park is 2 hours in the blue zone and 5 hours in the green zone.
Parking in the blue zone for two hours costs 2.05 euros. The green zone is a little cheaper, but the price per hour increases the longer you stay.
You have to take out your ticket at the parking meter and leave it visible inside the car, as in most cities.
The schedule is as follows:
Monday to Friday from 9:00 to 14:00 and from 16:00 to 20:00.
Saturdays from 9:00 to 14:00.
Sundays and holidays there is no charge.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Catedral de SalamancaQué ver en Salamanca: Catedral de SalamancaWhat to see in Salamanca: Salamanca Cathedral

Our recommendation is either that you park outside the centre and walk up to it, or that you look for a car park that catches you near the accommodation, because it is true that on weekends it is difficult to find space on the street in some areas.

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We park in the Parking Le Mans. To give you an idea of the price, we pay 10.30 euros for 6 hours. If you intend to leave it there (it is one of the closest parking lots to the Plaza Mayor), you should know that you can only pay with cash. When we finish visiting the city, we go by car to the accommodation, which is super close to the centre, and park for free on the street.

What to see in Salamanca in one day

It is clear that you do not need us to talk about Salamanca to know that it is worth visiting, because the charms of this Castilian city are known throughout Europe, but even so we want to do our small bit to make known the hidden treasures we have in Spain.

If you ask us what to see in Salamanca, these would undoubtedly be the places we recommend and which you should not miss. To make it easier for you, we’ve collected them all on this map, including several cool places to stop and eat:

Remember that you can use this map on your mobile to make it much more useful once you are there

Just save a copy on your Google Drive and open it on your mobile whenever you need it.

In the streets of Salamanca you breathe history, you breathe literature, you breathe poems and you breathe an air charged with all the things that the streets of the city have lived during the last centuries. Historical buildings hundreds of years old, a square that is the center of life for the people of Salamanca, beautiful stone churches on every corner… All surrounded by good food and good people. What more could you ask from a destination?

Qué ver en Salamanca: Patio de EscuelasQué ver en Salamanca: Patio de EscuelasWhat to see in Salamanca: Patio de Escuelas

Free tour of Salamanca: what to see in Salamanca in two hours

Without a doubt, we find free tours a great way to make a first contact when you first visit a city (or if you haven’t visited it for a long time, as was our case). So when we decided that we were going to visit Salamanca we didn’t hesitate to book it from here. Our guide Chus gave us a wonderful introduction to the history and the most important monuments of the city, so our recommendation is that if you have time, you should do it too, because it is really worth it. The guide is super fun and does not stop telling interesting anecdotes.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Plaza del CorrilloQué ver en Salamanca: Plaza del CorrilloWhat to see in Salamanca: Plaza del Corrillo

If you have more time, two other free tours are also available: one about the mysteries and legends of the city and another dramatized one. They are also super well rated by users so they can be a great option.

But come on, now you can see and do everything in Salamanca:

Main Square

One of the great curiosities of the Plaza Mayor of Salamanca is that it was built in the 18th century when the city was already made, so they had to negotiate with the owners of the houses that already existed around it in order to make at least the facade the same on all four sides.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Ayuntamiento de SalamancaQué ver en Salamanca: Ayuntamiento de SalamancaWhat to see in Salamanca: Salamanca City Hall

This square, the centre of Salamanca’s life, is very similar to Madrid’s Plaza Mayor because it was designed by an architect from Madrid: Alberto Churriguera. It is one of the largest and most charming squares in Spain, and also one of the great examples of the Baroque in our country.

Its square shape is flanked by arcades adorned by 88 arches. Next to each arch there is a sculpted medallion of important characters in the history of Spain: kings, military men, conquerors and other prominent figures in the arts, literature and religion.

Plaza del Corrillo and San Martín Church

If we leave the Plaza Mayor through the door located to the southwest we arrive at the Plaza del Corrillo, curious because its columns are decorated with eggs on top. Why? Because it was the square where the eggs were sold at the time.

The best thing about this square is undoubtedly to be able to observe how the city grew around its monuments. Because in this square, surrounded and camouflaged between houses, is the Church of San Martin, which has more than 800 years of history.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Iglesia de San MartínQué ver en Salamanca: Iglesia de San MartínWhat to see in Salamanca: Church of San Martín

Visiting the church is free and it is open during the following hours:

Tuesday to Friday from 11:00 to 14:00.
Saturdays from 11:00 to 14:00 and from 17:00 to 20:00
Sundays from 11:00 to 14:00.

Inside the church there is also a ‘hidden treasure’ that can be visited for 1.50 euros.

Main Street

Leaving the Plaza del Corrillo behind, we find ourselves facing the Calle Mayor, a meeting place for locals and tourists because it is full of shops and restaurants. The Rua Mayor also gives us access to two of the most important monuments in Salamanca: the Casa de las Conchas and the Clerecía.

Casa de las Conchas, one of the must see in Salamanca

Without a doubt, the Casa de los Conchas is one of our favourite monuments and one of the must-see in Salamanca. And not only because of its curious facade, but also because of what it houses inside.

The Casa de las Conchas is one of the most popular palaces in Salamanca and one of the best examples of Spanish civil Gothic architecture. Its construction began in 1493 and ended in 1517. The entire facade is decorated with shells that were placed to confirm the marriage of two nobles, Arias Maldonado and Juana de Pimentel, on whose coat of arms a shell appeared. And as Chus told us during the free tour, the shells are not on the Camino Santiago (although they may have become associated with it), the shells are there out of love.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Casa de las ConchasQué ver en Salamanca: Casa de las ConchasWhat to see in Salamanca: Casa de las ConchasQué ver en Salamanca: Patio de la Casa de las ConchasQué ver en Salamanca: Patio de la Casa de las ConchasWhat to see in Salamanca: Patio of the Casa de las Conchas

At present, the Casa de las Conchas functions as a public library and its interior can be visited free of charge. And it’s inside that is the real treasure. Its beautiful courtyard and stairs are undoubtedly something you cannot miss on your visit to Salamanca, because from the top floor you can get a beautiful view of the clergy towers.

The palace is open every day and the schedule is as follows:

Monday to Friday from 9:00 to 21:00.
Saturdays from 9:00 to 14:00 and from 16:00 to 19:00
Sundays and holidays from 10:00 to 14:00 and from 16:00 to 19:00.

The Clergy

Right in front of the Casa de las Conchas is La Clerecía. What was once the building of the Royal College of the Society of Jesus is now the headquarters of the Pontifical University.

Qué ver en Salamanca: La ClerecíaQué ver en Salamanca: La ClerecíaWhat to see in Salamanca: The Clergy

This baroque style building was ordered to be built by Philip III and Margaret of Austria in 1617. It is curious how the lower part of the façade, the one in front of the Casa de las Conchas, has hardly any decoration. They focused on the higher areas, which were the ones that would be seen when observing the building from a distance (being so close to the Casa de las Conchas, it is more difficult to appreciate the decoration of the lower area).

As in the Casa de las Conchas, its patio and the cloister stand out.

The entrance fee is 3 euros per person and the schedule is as follows:

From Tuesday to Friday from 10:30 to 12:45 and from 16:00 to 17:30
Saturdays and holidays from 10:30 to 13:30 and from 16:00 to 17:30.
Sundays from 10:30 to 13:30.
Monday closed.

Guided tours inside the building are available from 10:30 to 17:30 every 45 minutes. In addition, you can climb its imposing towers and they say you get the best views of the city from here. We couldn’t go up because of lack of time, but we read that it’s worth it.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Torres de La ClerecíaQué ver en Salamanca: Torres de La ClerecíaWhat to see in Salamanca: Torres de La Clerecía

The climb to the towers costs 3.75 euros per person, but there is a combined ticket for 6 euros per person with which you can visit La Clerecía and climb the towers. The schedule to climb the towers is from Monday to Sunday from 10:00 to 20:00 (except in December, January and February, which close at 18:00). If you visit the city on Tuesday, you can go up for free from 10:00 to 12:00.

University of Salamanca, one of the great must-sees in Salamanca

And we come to the great must-see to see in Salamanca! Its university, founded in 1218, is one of the first universities in Europe, along with those of Bologna, Paris and Oxford.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Fachada de la UniversidadQué ver en Salamanca: Fachada de la UniversidadWhat to see in Salamanca: Facade of the University

The building as we know it today began to be built in 1411 and was completed in 1533, and is one of the most important monuments of Spanish Renaissance art. Its plateresque facade is one of those things that you can’t stop looking at for hours, because it has an incredible level of detail. Plateresque art stands out because the stone is carved as if it were silver.

And this beautiful facade is where the famous frog of the University of Salamanca is located. And we warn you right now, that unless you know, or are told where she is, it’s impossible to find her. In any case, the frog is a mere anecdote that should not tarnish the beauty of this place.

ℹ️ If you travel with children, there are some brochures available at the tourist office that will help you discover the city as if you were doing a gymkhana, looking for all the curious elements in the city’s monuments: the frog, the astronaut…

Inside the building, the Fray Luis de León lecture hall stands out, as it does in the 17th century, as well as the spectacular Noble Staircase and the Old Library, a place that houses manuscripts and other valuable incunabula.

Qué ver en Salamanca: La rana en la fachada de la UniversidadQué ver en Salamanca: La rana en la fachada de la UniversidadWhat to see in Salamanca: The frog on the facade of the University

On the University campus there are several spaces that can be visited. I leave you below prices and schedules of each of them:

Historical building (Escuelas Mayores). A visit costs 10 euros per person (an audio guide can be rented for 2 euros) and the schedule is as follows:
From 16 September to 31 March, Monday to Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
From 1 April to 15 September, Monday to Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Sundays and holidays: from 10:00 to 14:00

House-Museum of Miguel de Unamuno. The entrance fee is 4 euros per person and the schedule is as follows:
Monday to Friday from 10:00 to 14:00 (last access at 13:00).
Holidays closed.

Salamanca Sky. Visiting is free and the schedule is as follows:
From April 1 to September 30, Monday to Saturday from 10:00 to 14:00 and from 16:00 to 20:00.
From 1 October to 31 March, Monday to Saturday from 10:00 to 14:00 and from 16:00 to 19:00.
Sundays and holidays from 10:00 to 14:00.

ℹ️ During your visit to this area, be sure to look at the red-dyed walls… They are not graffiti! Or at least not the modern concept of graffiti. When a student at the university finished his studies, they painted his name on the wall as recognition. As we were told, the higher the name, the better the grades the student got.

If you want to know the most special corners of the Salamanca that is illuminated every night, you can do it with this interesting tour.

Minor Schools Patio

Around the University, other buildings also emerged dedicated to study and other disciplines related to knowledge, such as the Minor Schools. These are so called because the pre-university education was given here.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Patio de las Escuelas MenoresQué ver en Salamanca: Patio de las Escuelas MenoresWhat to see in Salamanca: Patio de las Escuelas Menores

Also in the Plateresque style, they are accessed through a beautiful doorway that leads to a hall with a Gothic vault from which you can appreciate the beauty of this courtyard.

Salamanca Sky

Inside the patio of the Escuelas Menores is the ‘Cielo de Salamanca’, a fragment of the mural painting that covered the vault of the old University Library. Originally, the work was much bigger and is attributed to Fernando Gallego.

In it, the Sun, Mercury, the zodiacal signs and some constellations are represented, all related to the teaching of astronomy and astrology.

As I mentioned above, it is free to visit and you can find the schedule in the section where I told you about the University.

Old and New Cathedral, one of the best places to see in Salamanca

If you thought that a visit to the University would end everything, nothing could be further from the truth! A few steps from this beautiful temple of knowledge are the cathedrals of Salamanca. Yes, in plural, because just like in Vitoria, they also have two 😉

Qué ver en Salamanca: Catedral de SalamancaQué ver en Salamanca: Catedral de SalamancaWhat to see in Salamanca: Salamanca Cathedral

The Old Cathedral was started in 1120 and the New Cathedral around 1520. And I’m sure you’re wondering why. Well, here’s the explanation. By the end of the 15th century the population of Salamanca had increased significantly, thanks to the rise and fame of the University. The Old Cathedral had become too small and the predominance of the Gothic style had turned it into an archaic and impractical space. Come on, he was not up to the evolution that the city had undergone. So he started building the new one, attached to the old one.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Catedral de SalamancaQué ver en Salamanca: Catedral de SalamancaWhat to see in Salamanca: Salamanca Cathedral

At present, this group of cathedrals is one of the most important in Europe, the largest and tallest building in Salamanca, and can be seen from anywhere in the city, as one of the most important elements of the profile of Salamanca’s capital.

The truth is that we think it is essential to visit the cathedral from all four sides, because only then can you get an idea of its enormous beauty.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Catedral de SalamancaQué ver en Salamanca: Catedral de SalamancaWhat to see in Salamanca: Salamanca Cathedral

And here’s the astronaut! Which is equal to or more famous than the University Frog. But this one, no doubt, is MUCH easier to find.

A visit to the interior of the cathedral costs 6 euros per person. You can buy tickets in advance from here. If you want, you can also climb the cathedral towers for another 4 euros per person (6 euros if you decide to do the night tour) with the Ieronimus exhibition. They say that the views from above are great and that the visit is quite interesting (we couldn’t make it because we were too late).

Qué ver en Salamanca: Catedral de SalamancaQué ver en Salamanca: Catedral de SalamancaWhat to see in Salamanca: Salamanca Cathedral

The timetable of the cathedral is as follows:

Monday to Saturday from 10:00 to 18:00 (last entry at 17:15).
Sundays from 10:00 to 18:00 (last entry at 17:00).

The schedule for climbing the towers is as follows:

Every day from 10:00 to 20:00.

Calisto and Melibea Garden

Very close to the cathedral is the Orchard of Callisto and Melibea. Sound familiar? They are the protagonists of La Celestina, the play by Fernando Rojas.

It is located on the slope of the city wall, very close to the Tormes River, and is so called because Fernando de Rojas chose this place to recreate it in his novel. It is a garden reminiscent of Muslim gardens, full of plants and flowers.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Huerto de Calisto y MelibeaQué ver en Salamanca: Huerto de Calisto y MelibeaWhat to see in Salamanca: Huerto de Calisto y Melibea

Without any doubt, the best views of the cathedral are obtained from the Orchard of Calisto and Melibea.

Visiting this garden is free and it is open every day from 10:00 a.m. until sunset.

Salamanca Cave

In this cave you can find the Crypt of the old Church of San Cebrián and the Tower of Villena. A very curious legend surrounds this building. Because it is said that in this tower the devil taught magic and occult sciences.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Cueva de SalamancaQué ver en Salamanca: Cueva de SalamancaWhat to see in Salamanca: Salamanca Cave

Visiting the Cave of Salamanca is free and it is open from 10:00 to 18:00.

Convent of San Esteban

This spectacular building, which is a Dominican convent, has inside a huge temple, two beautiful cloisters and numerous rooms that are still used by the Dominicans.

Like the facade of the University, it is in the Plateresque style, but it also mixes other styles such as Baroque and Gothic.

The most curious thing about this place is that Christopher Columbus stayed here when he came to Salamanca to present at the University his project to travel to the Indies by sailing to the West. That journey in which I would unwittingly discover America.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Convento de San EstebanQué ver en Salamanca: Convento de San EstebanWhat to see in Salamanca: Convent of San Esteban

The visit to the Convent costs 4 euros per person and the schedule is as follows:

From 5 November to 29 March from 10:00 to 14:00 (last pass at 13:15) and from 16:00 to 18:00 (last pass at 17:15)
From 30 March to 3 November from 10:00 to 14:00 (last pass at 13:15) and from 16:00 to 20:00 (last pass at 19:15)

In addition, from Tuesday to Saturday at 11:30 and 12:00 it is possible to go up to the terrace of the convent.

In the southernmost part of the historical centre is the Casa Lis, an impressive palace surrounded by beautiful stained glass windows that make it a truly special building.

At present the Casa Lis houses the Museum of Decorative Arts, Art Nouveau and Art Deco, in which there are 19 collections from these two artistic periods on display.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Casa LisQué ver en Salamanca: Casa LisWhat to see in Salamanca: Casa Lis

The entrance to the museum costs 4 euros (can be used together to enter the Museum of the History of the Automobile) and the schedule is as follows:

From 15 March to 15 November, Monday to Sunday from 11:00 to 20:00.
From November 16 to March 15:
From Tuesday to Friday from 11:00 to 14:00 and from 16:00 to 19:00
Saturday and Sunday from 11:00 to 20:00.
Mondays, except holidays, closed.

Roman Bridge and Lazarillo de Tormes Statue

This beautiful Roman bridge, originally built in the first century, is part of the Vía de la Plata, very important during the economic boom of the Roman Empire, and connects the historic centre of Salamanca, north of the Tormes River, with the southern part of the city.

Qué ver en Salamanca: Estatua del Lazarillo de TormesQué ver en Salamanca: Estatua del Lazarillo de TormesWhat to see in Salamanca: Lazarillo de Tormes statueQué ver en Salamanca: Puente Romano de SalamancaQué ver en Salamanca: Puente Romano de SalamancaWhat to see in Salamanca: Roman Bridge of Salamanca

Only the arches closest to the city are original, the rest correspond to the restoration of the 18th century, but even so, it is worth taking a walk around.

What to see in Salamanca if you have plenty of time

Monterrey Palace. Built in the 16th century, it is currently owned by the Duke of Alba.
La Salina Palace. You can’t miss his yard.
Church of the Purisima. Completed in 1685, its façade and dome stand out.
Convento de las Dueñas. Founded in 1419, it has a beautiful cloister.
San Vicente Hill. The first stable settlement in the city was established on the Cerro de San Vicente in the Iron Age. It was here that the city of Salamanca emerged and thanks to the archaeological excavations you can see the remains of this settlement.
Museum of the History of the Automobile.
Take a bike tour of the city.
Qué ver en Salamanca: VítoresQué ver en Salamanca: VítoresWhat to see in Salamanca: Vítores

What to see in Salamanca: interesting excursions from Salamanca

Visit the Arribes del Duero.
Make an excursion to one of the 14 villages in the province declared historical sites, such as Alba de Tormes, la Alberca, Béjar or Candelario.
Escape to Green Harvest.
Make an excursion to the Sierra de Francia and Alba de Tormes.

Where to eat in Salamanca

The gastronomy of Salamanca is one of the most important charms of the city, so you can’t leave without trying it. Here are some of the typical dishes from the kitchens of Salamanca:

Ham and sausages from Guijuelo.
Armuña lentils.
Wine and cheese from the Arribes.
Dark meat.
Farinato. Known as the chorizo of the poor, it is made with breadcrumbs, lard, onion, salt, paprika, cumin, garlic, onion, aniseed grains, schnapps and a little olive oil.
Hornazo. To give you an idea, it’s like a pie filled with sausage and meat.
Chanfaina.
Potatoes wiggle.
Pig in a poke.

And as for the sweets, the Bollo Maimón stands out.

Jamones en SalamancaJamones en SalamancaHams in Salamanca

In the map of the city you have at the beginning of the post, you have a lot of options of places to eat, but the best recommendation we can give you is that you should BOOK, especially if you are going on a weekend. Don’t let it happen to you like it did to us, who went into 7 or 8 restaurants until we found room in one, which is probably one of the most expensive in Salamanca.

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We ate at the El Monje restaurant, which is inside the Palacio de San Esteban. The surroundings are spectacular and you will eat in a beautiful place, but it is quite expensive. We paid 107.50 euros for two soft drinks, a starter (pork dewlap), a dish for each (cachopo and lamb) and a shared dessert (a torrija). It was all good, but it was a lot of money, really. We are sure that it is super easy to find a site just as rich at a slightly more affordable price.

Comida en el Restaurante El MonjeComida en el Restaurante El MonjeLunch at El Monje RestaurantComida en el Restaurante El MonjeComida en el Restaurante El MonjeLunch at El Monje RestaurantComida en el Restaurante El MonjeComida en el Restaurante El MonjeLunch at El Monje RestaurantComida en el Restaurante El MonjeComida en el Restaurante El MonjeLunch at El Monje Restaurant

Here are some other interesting options for lunch and dinner in Salamanca:

Where to sleep in Salamanca

When we looked for our accommodation to visit Salamanca, we were very clear that we wanted something close to the centre, so that we could get there on foot and it would be cheap. And so we found the Ibis Salamanca, which really surprised us very pleasantly, especially for two things: the friendliness of its staff and its breakfast, which although simple, has everything and is delicious.

Dónde dormir en Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaDónde dormir en Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaWhere to stay in Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaDónde dormir en Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaDónde dormir en Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaWhere to stay in Salamanca: Ibis Salamanca

This Ibis is super new and the decor is beautiful. It has a bar next to the reception and an area with tables (where breakfast is eaten in the morning) where you can sit and have a drink. The room is simple but very spacious and great value for money for the place where the hotel is located.

Dónde dormir en Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaDónde dormir en Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaWhere to stay in Salamanca: Ibis Salamanca

In addition, the hotel is perfectly located for walking around the centre and you can park for free in the street (although if you need to, it also has a car park). Did you know that all Ibis can accommodate dogs for 8 euros a night? That alone is enough to win us over 😊

Dónde dormir en Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaDónde dormir en Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaWhere to stay in Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaDónde dormir en Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaDónde dormir en Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaWhere to stay in Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaDónde dormir en Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaDónde dormir en Salamanca: Ibis SalamancaWhere to stay in Salamanca: Ibis Salamanca

If you want to have a look at the room ‘live’, in the video we show you the whole room, as well as the rest of the hotel and the delicious breakfast.

We pay 67 euros for one night including breakfast. And I’m sure that when we return to Salamanca, we will certainly repeat.

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