What to see in Vitoria in two days [GUIDE + ITINERARY + MAP]

Summary of content of this post

We promised you a long time ago that we were going to get our hands on the Spanish destination guides, so here we are, albeit a little late, fulfilling that promise. Because it is true that we know Spain almost completely (although there will always be new places to discover), but we have not seriously set out to compile all the info and all the photos to make guides as complete as ours. So I’m going to stop making out because today I’m coming to tell you what to see in Vitoria in two days or a weekend.

And why Vitoria? Because it’s true that at first glance it may seem to have nothing to do with it. Well, nothing could be further from the truth. Even I was surprised! That I already knew her but hadn’t immersed myself in her secrets as she deserves. Vitoria has MUCH to do, to do and to eat. So on the occasion of our 30th birthday (yes, although I find that hard to believe too, my group of friends and I will be 30 in 2019), we went at eight o’clock to celebrate in this small inland city of the Basque Country, which is also its capital and the seat of the Basque Parliament.

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A little bit of history of Vitoria

Despite what many people think when they see Vitoria-Gasteiz on the posters, it is not that Gasteiz means Vitoria in Basque, as it does with Bilbao/Bilbo or San Sebastian/Donosti. Vitoria-Gasteiz is a compound name.

Vitoria was founded in 1181 by the Navarrese King Sancho VI, who after conquering the small village of Gasteiz (which comes from Gaztelu, meaning castle in Basque) named it Nueva Victoria.

Just save a copy on your Google Drive and open it on your mobile whenever you need it. On this occasion we have also included points of interest around Vitoria on the map in case you want to go on an excursion. The ones we recommend the most are the Salt Valley and the Salto del Nervión viewpoint.

In the streets of Vitoria you can breathe in the atmosphere of a city that has known how to adapt to evolution perfectly and that, knowing that it is a city much less valued by tourism than its neighbours, has made itself beautiful and has told visitors ‘here I am, come and meet me’: a route through its modern murals, streets full of bars, an old cathedral full of history immersed in a pharaonic restoration whose interior can be visited… All this surrounded by good food and good people. What more can you ask of a destination?

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Free tour of Vitoria: what to see in Vitoria in an hour and a half

Without a doubt, we find free tours a great way to make a first contact when you first visit a city (or if you haven’t visited it for a long time). So when we decided that we were going to visit Vitoria we did not hesitate to book it from here. Our guide Koldo gave us a wonderful introduction to the history and the most important monuments of the city, so our recommendation is that if you have time, you should do it too, because it is really worth it.

But come on, now you can see and do everything in Vitoria:

Plaza de España

This square inevitably reminds us of other similar Spanish squares such as the Plaza Mayor in Madrid or Salamanca. But for the people of Vitoria it is better known as The Blur Square because it has had so many names that were changed in the place now occupied by the clock, that in the end it ended up being a blur where it was almost impossible to decipher the real name.

It was built by the Vitoria architect Justo Antonio de Olaguibel, between 1781 and 1790, with the aim of having an area where to celebrate markets and celebrations outside the walls.

Qué ver en Vitoria: Plaza de EspañaQué ver en Vitoria: Plaza de EspañaWhat to see in Vitoria: Plaza de EspañaQué ver en Vitoria: Plaza de EspañaQué ver en Vitoria: Plaza de EspañaWhat to see in Vitoria: Plaza de España

The Town Hall and the Tourism Office are currently located in this square (as well as bars and other businesses), where you can pick up information leaflets, maps and consult the timetables for guided tours of the main monuments.

Plaza de la Virgen Blanca, one of the classics to see in Vitoria

Just a few steps from the Plaza de España (which is open on three of its four sides), you will find one of the most emblematic squares of Vitoria, because it is where all the important events of the city take place.

Qué ver en Vitoria: Plaza de la Virgen BlancaQué ver en Vitoria: Plaza de la Virgen BlancaWhat to see in Vitoria: Plaza de la Virgen Blanca

This is where the market was held in medieval times and where the descent from Celedon takes place every year during the Vitoria patron saint’s festival (held in August). If you want to know more about this curious way of starting the fiestas, you can read it here, but come on, I’m telling you they have nothing to envy the San Fermines of Pamplona 😉

Beyond the festive anecdotes, in the square you will find two emblems of the city:

The famous plant sculpture of Vitoria-Gasteiz, one of the most photographed spots in the city, and the emblem of the green and sustainable city that is Vitoria The monument to the ‘Battle of Vitoria’, built in 1917 and commemorating the victory over Napoleon’s troops on 21 July 1813.Qué ver en Vitoria: Plaza de la Virgen BlancaQué ver en Vitoria: Plaza de la Virgen BlancaWhat to see in Vitoria: Plaza de la Virgen BlancaQué ver en Vitoria: Plaza de la Virgen BlancaQué ver en Vitoria: Plaza de la Virgen BlancaWhat to see in Vitoria: Plaza de la Virgen Blanca

Church of San Miguel Arcángel

In the northern part of the Plaza de la Virgen Blanca, the tower of the Iglesia de San Miguel, which is the oldest temple in the city, appears (it already appeared in writings in 1181 on the occasion of the granting of the Fuero).

The church also houses the chapel of the Virgen Blanca, patron saint of the city, with a polychrome carving from the mid-19th century.

Herrería Street

One of the streets that leaves the Plaza de la Virgen Blanca is Herrería Street, through which we enter the old town of Vitoria. This area is full of streets named after the different guilds of the time: smithy, shoe shop, cutlery shop… Don’t stop walking them all, because each one has its own charm.

Qué ver en Vitoria: calle Herrería con la iglesia de San Pedro de fondoQué ver en Vitoria: calle Herrería con la iglesia de San Pedro de fondoWhat to see in Vitoria: Herrería street with the church of San Pedro in the background

San Pedro Church

This church, which is considered one of the most beautiful Gothic temples in northern Spain and a National Historic and Artistic Monument, is embedded between the streets and between the buildings that surround it. It was built in the 14th century on top of a previous century parish church attached to the wall, so it also played a defensive role at the time.

Qué ver en Vitoria: iglesia de San PedroQué ver en Vitoria: iglesia de San PedroWhat to see in Vitoria: San Pedro Church

The most interesting feature of this church, apart from its tower, is the old 14th century Gothic doorway (which can be seen from Herrería Street), as it is one of the most important sculptural groups in the Basque Country.

Qué ver en Vitoria: iglesia de San PedroQué ver en Vitoria: iglesia de San PedroWhat to see in Vitoria: San Pedro Church

Built in the 11th century by King Sancho IV of Navarre, the city wall served to fortify the ancient settlement of Vitoria-Gasteiz (the root of the current city). You can walk around part of the old wall and observe one of its towers. The town council organises guided tours of the wall and its history. You can find more information here.

Qué ver en Vitoria: la murallaQué ver en Vitoria: la murallaWhat to see in Vitoria: the city wallsQué ver en Vitoria: la murallaQué ver en Vitoria: la murallaWhat to see in Vitoria: the city walls

But watch out! Because there are areas in which the wall is a reconstruction of the 1960s that does not have the historical aesthetic that it should. Look at the details, because you will surely find some ‘gazapo’ 😉

Santa María Cathedral or Old Cathedral, one of the most interesting places to see in Vitoria

The Cathedral of Santa Maria or Old Cathedral, as it is also known, is the most emblematic temple of the city. Built in the 13th century, it is located on the highest part of the hill and encloses within its walls the history of the city. And I promise you that this is not a literary license, it’s reality. Without any doubt, this cathedral was one of the places that surprised me the most and a super essential to see in Vitoria.

Qué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaWhat to see in Vitoria: Santa María Cathedral

The cathedral, which is a World Heritage Site, was built on the ruins of a primitive church in the village of Gasteiz and served in its day as a fortress for the defence of the city (its walls reach a height of 20 metres).

Qué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaWhat to see in Vitoria: Santa María CathedralQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaWhat to see in Vitoria: Santa María CathedralQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaWhat to see in Vitoria: Santa María CathedralQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaWhat to see in Vitoria: Santa María Cathedral

The sad part of this story is that as it is such an old building, and because of the continuous ‘uncontrolled’ modifications (which had caused the cathedral to be on the verge of collapse), it has been in the process of restoration for several years. But the good thing is that in spite of this, its interior can be visited, from the foundations to the top, knowing along the way the secrets of its construction that inspired authors like Ken Follet or Paulo Coelho.

Qué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaWhat to see in Vitoria: Santa María CathedralQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaWhat to see in Vitoria: Santa María CathedralQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaWhat to see in Vitoria: Santa María CathedralQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaWhat to see in Vitoria: Santa María Cathedral

I’m not a Catholic, nor a believer, nor do I have a passion for churches, but really, the guided tour of this cathedral is something you do or have to do when you visit Vitoria. Because what you will discover is not the history of a church, but the evolution of a city over 10 centuries. It is undoubtedly one of the most interesting guided tours I have taken in Spain.

The guided tour begins at the foundations and climbs up to the tower, from where the best views of the city can be seen. And I don’t want to keep you up because you have to, but I assure you it’s really interesting.

Qué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaWhat to see in Vitoria: Santa María CathedralQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaWhat to see in Vitoria: Santa María CathedralQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral de Santa MaríaWhat to see in Vitoria: Santa María Cathedral

Please note that if you want to make this visit and you are going to visit Vitoria at the weekend or in high season, it is important that you book. You can do it from here. We went there during the December holiday (very bad date) and ended up getting space by phone.

The entrance fee is 10.50 euros and is paid between 3 and 5 times a day depending on the day of the week in the morning and afternoon. You have more info here.

Plaza de las Burullerías

In the lower part of the old cathedral is the Plaza de las Burullerías, an old medieval necropolis, which was baptized with this name because it was the place where they used to trade in fabrics and cloths, known then as burullerías.

Qué ver en Vitoria: Mural en la Plaza de las BurulleríasQué ver en Vitoria: Mural en la Plaza de las BurulleríasWhat to see in Vitoria: Mural in the Plaza de las Burullerías

Anda Tower

And right next to the square, built in the 15th century, is the Anda Tower, one of the oldest buildings in Vitoria. It is also a Gothic building that was part of the city’s defensive system.

Qué ver en Vitoria: Torre de los AndaQué ver en Vitoria: Torre de los AndaWhat to see in Vitoria: Torre de los Anda

Escoriaza-Esquivel Palace

In the upper part of the old town of Vitoria we find three Renaissance palaces and this is the first of them.

Built between 1530 and 1541 by order of Fernán López de Escoriaza, physician at the Court of Emperor Charles V, the Escoriaza-Esquivel Palace is a key piece of the Renaissance in Vitoria. On the plateresque cover of its main façade, the busts of the owner and his wife, Victoria de Anda y Esquivel, can be seen in stone.

Qué ver en Vitoria: Palacio Escoriaza-EsquivelQué ver en Vitoria: Palacio Escoriaza-EsquivelWhat to see in Vitoria: Escoriaza-Esquivel Palace

Montehermoso Palace

A few steps south of the Escoriaza-Esquivel Palace is the Montehermoso Palace, which was built in 1520 by Ortuño Ibáñez de Aguirre, advisor to Charles V. This Renaissance palace was the place where the monarchy stayed when they visited the city, later the Episcopal see and nowadays it is a cultural centre dedicated to the avant-garde.

Here lived Joseph Bonaparte, Napoleon’s brother, who was King of Spain from 1808 to 1813. And the Montehermoso Palace was witness to the love affair between the Marquise of Montehermoso and Pepe Botella (which is how the Spanish called the foreign king).

Qué ver en Vitoria: Palacio de MontehermosoQué ver en Vitoria: Palacio de MontehermosoWhat to see in Vitoria: Montehermoso Palace

Villasuso Palace

This beautiful palace, which is a few steps south of the Montehermoso Palace, is currently a conference venue but… Who could look out on that balcony every morning!

The Renaissance building that houses it, built in 1538 by Martin de Salinas, ambassador of Charles V, retains in its structure part of the walls of the old wall. In addition to its impressive balcony, the main hall stands out with a 16th century Flemish tapestry from the Brussels school.

Qué ver en Vitoria: Palacio de VillasusoQué ver en Vitoria: Palacio de VillasusoWhat to see in Vitoria: Palacio de Villasuso

Bendaña Palace

Already in the lower part of the old town but also of the Renaissance we find this other palace. Built in 1525, the Bendaña Palace rests on an earlier tower-house, hence this stately home has a cylindrical tower.

At present, it is part of the Bibat building, the Museum of Archaeology and Fournier de Naipes.

Plaza del Machete

After several squares, you will have noticed that in Vitoria they love to give curious names to the squares: let’s go now to the Plaza del Machete.

Qué ver en Vitoria: Parte trasera de la Plaza del MacheteQué ver en Vitoria: Parte trasera de la Plaza del MacheteWhat to see in Vitoria: Back of Plaza del Machete

This square, which is located just below the Villasuso Palace, owes its name to the machete on which the city’s Attorney General was sworn in at the time. In fact, a replica of the weapon can be seen on display in an urn outside the church of San Miguel, located at one of the corners of the square.

Cordon House

And we continue with the palaces! Because you’ve already seen that there are a few in Vitoria. It is the turn of the Casa del Cordón, which is named after the stone Franciscan cord that surrounds its entrance arch.

This late 15th century palace houses a 13th century medieval tower with a spectacular starry vault. Visiting the interior is free, so don’t miss it 😉

Qué ver en Vitoria: Casa del CordónQué ver en Vitoria: Casa del CordónWhat to see in Vitoria: Casa del Cordón

New Cathedral of Vitoria

You know how the Basques are, that for lack of a cathedral, they have two. So in addition to the old cathedral at the top of the old town, they have the New Cathedral located at the bottom of the central almond (as they call it).

Qué ver en Vitoria: Catedral NuevaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral NuevaWhat to see in Vitoria: New CathedralQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral NuevaQué ver en Vitoria: Catedral NuevaWhat to see in Vitoria: New Cathedral

Of beautiful neo-Gothic style, it began to be built in 1907. And in addition to being a place of worship, it houses the Diocesan Museum of Sacred Art.

If you feel like it, you can hire a guided tour of the cathedral here.

Route through the Murals, a must see in Vitoria

If you have been walking around Vitoria for a while, you will have noticed that it is full of wonderful modern art murals. In our super map there is a section that includes each and every one of the murals of the city in case you don’t want to miss any.

Qué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadWhat to see in Vitoria: Murals of the cityQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadWhat to see in Vitoria: Murals of the cityQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadWhat to see in Vitoria: Murals of the cityQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadWhat to see in Vitoria: Murals of the cityQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadWhat to see in Vitoria: Murals of the cityQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadWhat to see in Vitoria: Murals of the cityQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadWhat to see in Vitoria: Murals of the cityQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadQué ver en Vitoria: Murales de la ciudadWhat to see in Vitoria: Murals of the city

Also, if you feel like it, you can hire a guided tour of all of them here. We did it on our own, but I read that it’s super interesting and only costs 5 euros per person.

Green Ring

About 10 minutes drive from the city centre we are surprised by this huge green space perfect for walking, sports, bird watching and deer watching. Yeah, yeah, you read that right. In this huge park in Vitoria they have huge deer in the wild. Naive of me, when they told us at the park’s information center I didn’t believe it, but it’s completely true.

The Green Belt consists of six very different parks, equipped with rest areas and information points, which you can walk or cycle through. Meadows, woods, hills, some endangered animals, archaeological sites, lagoons, streams… If you like getting lost in nature, don’t miss a walk along the Green Belt of Vitoria.

Qué ver en Vitoria: Anillo VerdeQué ver en Vitoria: Anillo VerdeWhat to see in Vitoria: Anillo VerdeQué ver en Vitoria: Anillo VerdeQué ver en Vitoria: Anillo VerdeWhat to see in Vitoria: Anillo Verde

If, after visiting all these points of interest on your own, you feel like learning more about the city, you can take this guided tour which will give you a more complete view of the city and its history. You also have available this other tour of the legends and mysteries that I’m sure must be super interesting because in the free tour they already made us a little introduction.

What to see in Vitoria if you have plenty of time

Ajuria Enea Palace, Santa Isabel Cemetery, Artium or Basque Museum of Contemporary Art, Bibat or Archaeology Museum and Fournier Playing Cards Museum in Álava, Casa Museo de los Faroles (Lantern House Museum), and a bicycle tour of the city.

What to see in Vitoria: interesting excursions from Vitoria

Visit the Añana Salt Valley. The salt flats are over 6,500 years old and are set out on terraces where the salt is still extracted by hand. Visit the Varona Tower-House, take a trip to a winery in the Rioja Alavesa and go on an excursion to the Izki Natural Park.The Zadorra reservoirs and the Aramaio valley, visit the monumental complex of Quejana (palace, church and fortified monastery) and the medieval town of Artziniega, with its Renaissance tower and ethnographic museum, and go into the Middle Ages by visiting the 12th century Estibaliz Monastery, a jewel of the Romanesque style in the Basque Country.

Where to eat in Vitoria

Dónde comer en Vitoria: PintxosDónde comer en Vitoria: PintxosWhere to eat in Vitoria: Pintxos

If I tell you that wherever you go you’ll eat well, I’m not wrong, I promise. It’s not because of the Basque blood, but in the north they always eat in luxury. Moreover, this widespread culture of pintxo-pote (eating pintxos and potear, which is drinking), is simply wonderful.

Here are some of the typical dishes of Alava’s gastronomy:

Perretxikos (St. George’s mushrooms or spring mushrooms).Caracoles a la alavesa.Habitas a la vitoriana.Pencas de acelga rellenas.Queso Idiazabal.

And as for sweets, the most important are goxua and Gasteiz cake.

Dónde comer en Vitoria: PintxosDónde comer en Vitoria: PintxosWhere to eat in Vitoria: Pintxos

We were lucky enough to arrive in Vitoria in the middle of the Ardoaraba, a wine festival that fills the city’s squares with tents in which to taste the best wines at a good price. But don’t worry, because the rest of the year it’s also super easy to find good places to drink and eat. In Cuchillería Street or Kutxi Street, as the locals know it, there are plenty of bars to choose from for drinking.

Of all the ones we tested, which were a few, I’m going to tell you about the highlights:

We fell into this bar because it’s right next to the apartment we were staying in, and hey, what a hit! Any of his skewers are spectacular, but don’t miss ‘el serranito’.

Dónde comer en Vitoria: El Rincón de Luis MariDónde comer en Vitoria: El Rincón de Luis MariWhere to eat in Vitoria: El Rincón de Luis Mari

We returned several times during our stay and on all occasions we were treated wonderfully.

At the beginning of Cuchillería Street you will find this restaurant that is always up to the minute. If you want to go and it’s the weekend, try to book, because we did it late and they only gave us a table at 15:30 and on the terrace.

They have a super varied weekend menu at a very good price (15.50 euros). Simple, but with quality products. It is true that it was not the richest meal we had during our stay in Vitoria, but for the price we paid it was not bad.

Dónde comer en Vitoria: El SieteDónde comer en Vitoria: El SieteWhere to eat in Vitoria: El SieteDónde comer en Vitoria: El SieteDónde comer en Vitoria: El SieteWhere to eat in Vitoria: El SieteDónde comer en Vitoria: El SieteDónde comer en Vitoria: El SieteWhere to eat in Vitoria: El Siete

In this bar, which is very close to the new cathedral, we tasted one of the most delicious pintxos of the whole trip: Sagartoki’s eggs. Inside a little packet of phyllo paste, the yolk of an egg that can go by itself, with bacon, with chistorra or with truffle. Seriously, there are few richer things I’ve tasted in my life. My kingdom for one of those eggs now!

Dónde comer en Vitoria: SagartokiDónde comer en Vitoria: SagartokiWhere to eat in Vitoria: Sagartoki

In Sagartoki we also ate a delicious potato omelette, because if the thing was about eggs 😉

Dónde comer en Vitoria: SagartokiDónde comer en Vitoria: SagartokiWhere to eat in Vitoria: Sagartoki

If you have a sweet tooth, very close to Sagartoki there is a small and charming cafe called Caressa where they have a delicious homemade pastry. Besides, their owners are charming and will help you to have a super nice time 😊

Dónde comer en Vitoria: CaressaDónde comer en Vitoria: CaressaWhere to eat in Vitoria: CaressaDónde comer en Vitoria: CaressaDónde comer en Vitoria: CaressaWhere to eat in Vitoria: Caressa

Don’t forget that the best way to get money or pay abroad is with travel cards, your best ally to save as much as possible on your travels. In this post we review the most important ones, we tell you their advantages and disadvantages and we make available all the discounts and offers that we have obtained for you 😉. For example, if you order your Bnext card through our link and recharge 25 euros, you get another 5. The N26 card, on the other hand, is the best option for paying when you travel.

Here are some other interesting options for lunch and dinner in Vitoria:

If you prefer to visit the best bars and pintxos in Vitoria accompanied by a local, you can do so with this gastronomic tour. And if you’ve been wanting more, here’s a map with a lot of restaurants and pintxo bars. You won’t get hungry! 😉

Where to sleep in Vitoria

When we planned our trip to Vitoria we were looking for a big place where we could all be together, so the best option was an apartment. We found one very close to the center, in Rioja street that had 4 rooms, a fairly large living room and a kitchen that served its purpose (although the truth is that we did not use it much).

It’s called the Dolce Vita apartment and its owner, a Brazilian who has lived in Spain for many years, is really charming. We paid for two nights about 50 euros each and if we came back we would repeat without any doubt, especially because of the location, close to everything but far from the hustle and bustle.

Dónde dormir en Vitoria: apartamento Dolce VitaDónde dormir en Vitoria: apartamento Dolce VitaWhere to sleep in Vitoria: Dolce Vita apartmentDónde dormir en Vitoria: apartamento Dolce VitaDónde dormir en Vitoria: apartamento Dolce VitaWhere to sleep in Vitoria: Dolce Vita apartment

Below I show you some superb accommodation options in Booking in Vitoria:

NH Canciller Ayala >> 8,6/10 de puntuación en Booking y alrededor de 80 euros la noche sin desayuno.Silken Ciudad de Vitoria >> 8,7/10 de puntuación en Booking y alrededor de 77 euros la noche sin desayuno.Hotel Centro Vitoria >> 8.3/10th of a score in Booking and about 49 euros a night without breakfast.

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